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This online ce course is offered in cooperation with Elsevier Science Publishing and utilizes text from the textbook “Stroke Rehabilitation – A Function Based Approach” Third Edition by Glen Gillen, EdD, OTR, FAOTA 
© 2011
 
Instructional Level: Beginner to Intermediate
 
This course provides the latest research in assessment and intervention; offering a definitive guide to successful outcomes in stroke rehabilitation.  The text combines aspects of background medical information, a comprehensive review of standardized and nonstandardized evaluation procedures and assessments, treatment techniques and evidence-based interventions.

Throughout this continuing education course clinicians are provided with specific suggestions to maintain a client-centered approach when working with stroke survivors.  The course includes the most up-to-date research on stroke rehabilitation from a variety of rehabilitation settings and professions, challenging the clinician to use the most current treatment approaches (including both remediation and adaptation approaches) to decrease impairments, prevent secondary complications, improve the clients ability to perform meaningful activities, decrease participation restrictions and improve quality of life.

To better meet your professional needs, this fully illustrated text of 776 pages has been carefully broken down by sections into 7 modules.  Each module approved for 10 contact hours of post-graduate continuing education (NOTE: board approvals vary state to state, please check your states approval status in the state specific course catalog by returning to our home page and entering both your state and profession).
 
Each 10 contact hour module can be purchased individually or combined with one or all of the other modules from this course to create a Course Bundle.  Each course is offered in two easy formats to again meet your professional needs.  You can choose to have immediate access to your course by selecting the online format (PDF download) or a hard copy of the material can be rushed to your home by selecting our mail format.  

Available for Occupational TherapistOccupational Therapist AssistantsPhysical TherapistPhysical Therapist Assistant

Modules In Course

Module 1: Medical Management, Psychological Aspects, Improving Participation and Quality of Life, Task Oriented Approach with Activity- Based Intervention.
Stroke Rehabilitation
Module 1: Medical Management, Psychological Aspects, Improving Participation and Quality of Life, Task Oriented Approach with Activity- Based Intervention.
Module Goals and Objectives
 
Module Goals:This course is intended to instruct the professional through a self-paced study on Medical Management, Psychological Aspects, Improving Participation and Quality of Life and Task Oriented Approach with Activity Based Intervention.
Professional Learning Objectives
1.    Discuss the pathology of a stroke.
2.    Differentiate between the various sources of emboli.
3.    Demonstrate knowledge in the types of thrombotic stroke.
4.    Discuss lacunar syndrome.
5.    Identify possible causes of hemorrhagic stroke.
6.    Demonstrate knowledge in Strokelike Syndromes.
7.    Discuss medical stroke management for patients who have had ischemic strokes.
8.    Explain thrombolytic therapy and when this type of treatment should be initiated.
9.    Identify neurological complications associated with stroke.
10.  Differentiate between seizures in patients with SAH and patients with ICH.
11.  Demonstrate knowledge in the psychological aspects of stroke rehabilitation.
12.  Discuss methods of improving participation and quality of life.
13.  Explain client-centered care.
14.  Identify the quality of life scales used in rehabilitation.
15.  Discuss barriers to participation and quality of life.
16.  Identify the advantages of home health.
17.  Demonstrate knowledge in the theoretical assumptions and models underlying the task-oriented approach to stroke rehabilitation.
18.  Explain activity-based intervention in stroke rehabilitation.
19.  Discuss foundational strategies for task performance.
20.  Demonstrate knowledge in skill development in stroke rehabilitation.
21.  Differentiate between blocked and random (or variable) practice schedules.
22.  Define contextual interference.
23.  List the different practice conditions for different task categories.
24.  Demonstrate knowledge in the primary and secondary impairments encountered by patients as a result of mechanical constraints.
25.  Identify self monitoring skills for stroke survivors.
26.  Define metacognition.
27.  Discuss task analysis and problem-solving skills.


Included in Module 1: Medical Management, Psychological Aspects, Improving Participation and Quality of Life, Task Oriented Approach with Activity-Based Intervention
Chapter 1:  Pathophysiology, Medical Management, and Acute Rehabilitation of Stroke Survivors
Chapter 2:  Psychological Aspects of Stroke Rehabilitation
Chapter 3:  Improving Participation and Quality of Life through Occupation
Chapter 4:  Task-Oriented Approach to Stroke Rehabilitation
Chapter 5:  Activity-Based Intervention in Stroke Rehabilitation

Module 2: Trunk and Motor Control Dysfunction, Balance Impairments and Vestibular Rehabilitation
Stroke Rehabilitation
Module 2: Trunk and Motor Control Dysfunction, Balance Impairments and Vestibular Rehabilitation
Module Goals and Objectives
 
Module Goals:This course is intended to instruct the professional through a self-paced study on Trunk and Motor Control Dysfunction, Balance Impairments and Vestibular Rehabilitation.
Professional Learning Objectives
1.    Define evidence-based rehabilitation.
2.    Differentiate between randomized controlled trials, a cohort study and before-and-after design studies.
3.    Discuss neurotherapeutic approaches to stroke rehabilitation.
4.    Discuss functional task-oriented trainings in stroke rehabilitation.
5.    Demonstrate knowledge in trunk control.
6.    Identify the improvements in trunk control that may be observed during the first month of rehabilitation.
7.    Explain common trunk impairments.
8.    Identify the results associated with anterior and/or posterior pelvic tilt.
9.    Demonstrate knowledge in range of motion of the vertebral column.
10.  Identify the main action of the transverse abdominis and the impairments associated with weakness.
11.  Discuss the actions of the Posterior trunk muscles.
12.  List standardized test that are available measurements for trunk control.
13.  Discuss observations of trunk alignment/malalignment.
14.  Identify typical malalignments that occur after stroke.
15.  Demonstrate knowledge in the evaluation of specific trunk movement patterns.
16.  Explain treatment techniques to enhance trunk control during task performance.
17.  Discuss sensory organization.
18.  Demonstrate knowledge in postural control.
19.  Identify the cerebellum as the primary integrating and modulating force in balance control, and the effects of disorders involving the cerebellum.
20.  Discuss the Berg Balance Scale.
21.  Demonstrate knowledge in establishing goals and treatment plans for balance impairments.
22.  Explain treatment planning and sensory organization.
23.  Discuss vestibular rehabilitation.
24.  Demonstrate knowledge in the basic anatomy of the vestibular system as it relates to function.
25.  Identify the inertial mechanisms of the vestibular labyrinth.
26.  Discuss lateral medullary syndrome.
27.  Demonstrate knowledge of the complications associated with lesions of the vestibular areas in the cerebral cortex.
28.  Identify the most common stroke of the vestibular system.
29.   Discuss habituation exercises and activities.


Included in Module 2:  Trunk and Motor Control Dysfunction, Balance Impairments and Vestibular Rehabilitation
Chapter 6:  Approaches to Motor Control Dysfunction: An Evidence-Based Review
Chapter 7:  Trunk Control: Supporting Functional Independence
Chapter 8:  Overview of Balance Impairments: Functional Implications
Chapter 9:  Vestibular Rehabilitation and Stroke

Module 3: Edema Control, and Upper Extremity Function and Management
Stroke Rehabilitation
Module 3: Edema Control, and Upper Extremity Function and Management
Module Goals and Objectives
 
Module Goals:This course is intended to instruct the professional through a self-paced study on Edema Control, and Upper Extremity Function and Management.
Professional Learning Objectives
1.    Discuss upper extremity function and management.
2.    Differentiate between positive and negative symptoms of a central nervous system lesion as classified by Huglings Jackson.
3.    Discuss activity analysis of select upper extremity tasks.
4.    Demonstrate knowledge in the appropriate use of the Motor Activity Log.
5.    Discuss evaluation tools available for management of upper extremity function.
6.    Explain the Motricity Index.
7.    Define in-hand manipulation.
8.    Identify the inefficient movement patters associated with stroke rehabilitation.
9.    Discuss selected adjunct interventions used with a task-oriented approach.
10.  Explain the effects of electrical stimulation.
11.  Demonstrate knowledge in the benefit of integrating strengthening interventions in to rehabilitation to regain limb function.
12.  Discuss the loss of soft–tissue elasticity and the contribution of immobilization.
13.  Identify preventative measures for contractures.
14.  Explain strategies to teach patients safe range of motion.
15.  Discuss shoulder-hand syndrome and the major diagnostic criteria.
16.  Demonstrate knowledge in superimposed orthopedic injuries.
17.  Discuss the immediate loss of biomechanical alignment following a stroke.
18.  Discuss rehabilitation technologies to promote upper limb recovery after stroke.
19.  Demonstrate knowledge in the advantages and disadvantages of robot assisted therapy.
20.  Explain the Assisted Rehabilitation and Measurement (ARM) Guide.
21.  Identify methods of functional electrical stimulation.
22.  Discuss devices available for repetitive task practice.
23.  Demonstrate knowledge in edema control.
24.  Explain the etiology of stroke hand edema control.
25.  Identify edema evaluation methods.
26.  Discuss the rebound test.
27.  Discuss clinical treatment considerations for edema control.
28.  Demonstrate knowledge in thoracic outlet syndrome.
29.  Identify the benefits of splinting to reduce edema.
30.  Discuss neuroprosthetic functional electrical stimulation and the benefit of using such devices for edema control.


Included in Module 3: Edema Control, and Upper Extremity Function and Management
Chapter 10: Upper Extremity Function
Chapter 11: Rehabilitation Technologies to Promote Upper Limb Recovery after Stroke
Chapter 12: Edema Control
Module 4: Splinting, Functional Mobility, Gait Awareness and Visuospatial Impairments
Stroke Rehabilitation
Module 4: Splinting, Functional Mobility, Gait Awareness and Visuospatial Impairments
Module Goals and Objectives
 
Module Goals: This course is intended to instruct the professional through a self-paced study on Clinical Reasoning, Neurobehavior Deficits, Cognitive-Perceptual Deficits and Speech and Language Deficits.
Professional Learning Objectives
1.    Discuss the various splinting applications available for stroke rehabilitation.
2.    Explain the biomechanical and neurophysiological approaches to splinting.
3.    Differentiate between dorsal splinting and volar splinting techniques.
4.    Discuss the implications for the finger spreader splint.
5.    Demonstrate knowledge in orthokinetic orthotics.
6.    Identify splints recommended for patients with hypertonicity.
7.    Differentiate between thumb loop and thumb abduction splints.
8.    Explain the considerations in prescribing and designing a splint for the distal extremity after stroke.
9.    Identify the consequences of prolonged positioning following immobilization.
10.Discuss treatment options for joint contractures with low-load prolonged stress.
11.Demonstrate knowledge in the results of prolonged wrist and digit flexion.
12.Discuss learned nonuse.
13.Explain the general fabrications guidelines of splinting material.
14.Discuss wrist, digit and thumb support when splinting.
15.Discuss functional mobility.
16.Identify problems associated with the mobility task of bridging.
17.Discuss the activities of sitting in the acute stages after a stroke.
18.Discuss weight shift during transfer techniques.
19.Demonstrate knowledge of the analysis of movement in the sit-to-stand movement.
20.Define motor impersistence.
21.List the advantages of the Motor Assessment Scale.
22.Discuss gait awareness.
23.Identify the observations of deviations in abnormal gait.
24.Identify the anatomical structures that most influence gait.
25.Discuss the affects of visual impairments on gait.
26.Demonstrate knowledge in the management of visual and visuospatial impairments.
27.List typical visual impairments that result from brain damage.
28.Define hemianopsia.
29.Differentiate between hemianopsia and diplopia.


Included in Module 4:  Splinting, Functional Mobility, Gait Awareness and Visuospatial Impairments
Chapter 13:  Splinting Applications
Chapter 14:  Functional Mobility
Chapter 15:  Gait Awareness
Chapter 16:  Managing Visual and Visuospatial Impairments to Optimize Function

Module 5: Clinical Reasoning, Neurobehavior Deficits, Cognitive-Perceptual Deficits and Speech and Language Deficits
Stroke Rehabilitation
Module 5: Clinical Reasoning, Neurobehavior Deficits, Cognitive-Perceptual Deficits and Speech and Language Deficits
Module Goals and Objectives
 
Module Goals:This course is intended to instruct the professional through a self-paced study on Clinical Reasoning, Neurobehavior Deficits, Cognitive-Perceptual Deficits and Speech and Language Deficits.
Professional Learning Objectives
1.    Discuss clinical reasoning when working with patients who have cognitive and perceptual problems following stroke.
2.    Discuss procedural reasoning.
3.    Differentiate between procedural reasoning and interactive reasoning.
4.    Define conditional reasoning.
5.    Identify the impact of neurobehavioral deficits on activities of daily living.
6.    Discuss the indications of neurobehavioral impairments that limit ADLs.
7.    Demonstrate knowledge in the functional localization for neurological processing of body functions.
8.    Discuss dysfunction of the activities of daily living area of occupation due to stroke.
9.    Identify dysfunction of sensory functions.
10.  Demonstrate knowledge in the manifestation of neurobehavioral impairments during task performance.
11.  Identify the possible observations of global and specific mental functions.
12.  Discuss pervasive impairments.
13.  Demonstrate knowledge of cortical involvement and patterns of impairment associated with cerebral artery dysfunction.
14.  Discuss treatment of cognitive-perceptual deficits.
15.  Identify treatment approaches to cognitive-perceptual deficits.
16.  Identify intervention strategies implemented during cognitive rehabilitation.
17.  Discuss the benefits associated with group treatment.
18.  Define and discuss apraxia.
19.  Discuss perseveration and clinical signs of perseveration.
20.  Define and discuss unilateral neglect.
21.  Differentiate between awareness training and scanning training.
22.  Discuss topographical disorientations and treatment options.
23.  Define agnosia.
24.  Identify memory impairments that may occur in patients who have sustained a stroke.
25.  Discuss errorless learning strategies.
26.  Explain executive function impairments.
27.  Discuss the management of speech and language deficits following a stroke.
28.  Discuss dysarthria and differentiate between unilateral upper motor neuron dysarthria and spastic dysarthria.
29.  Identify language disorders that are associated with stroke.
30.  Demonstrate knowledge in diagnosis and treatment options for transcortical motor aphasia.
31.   Explain cognitive communication impairments.


Included in Module 5:  Clinical Reasoning, Neurobehavior Deficits, Cognitive-Perceptual Deficits and Speech and Language Deficits
Chapter 17:  How Therapist Think
Chapter 18:  Impact of Neurobehavioral Deficits on ADLs
Chapter 19:  Treatment of Cognitive-Perceptual Deficits: A Function-Based Approach
Chapter 20:  Managing Speech and Language Deficits after Stroke

Module 6: Enhancing Performance of ADLs, Parenting after Stroke, Mobility, Dysphagia Management and Sexual Functions
Stroke Rehabilitation
Module 6:  Enhancing Performance of ADLs, Parenting after Stroke, Mobility, Dysphagia Management and Sexual Functions
Module Goals and Objectives
 
Module Goals:This course is intended to instruct the professional through a self-paced study on Enhancing Performance of ADLs, Parenting after Stroke, Mobility, Dysphagia Management and Sexual Functions
Professional Learning Objectives
1.    Demonstrate knowledge in enhancing performance of activities of daily living.
2.    Recognize the effect of stroke on a person’s engagement in activities of daily living.
3.    Discuss the client-centered intervention process.
4.    Demonstrate knowledge of the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS).
5.    Discuss the roles of the rehabilitation therapist to guide baby care adaptations for parents following stroke.
6.    Explain visual history.
7.    Identify useful positions and holding devices for a parent with limited sitting balance after stroke.
8.    Discuss transition and navigating social obstacles integral to parenting.
9.    Discuss driving and community mobility as an instrumental activity of daily living.
10.  Explain the ways in which a driver processes information and makes conscious or unconscious decisions.
11.  Demonstrate knowledge of the Cognitive Behavioral Drivers Inventory (CBDI).
12.  Identify compensatory techniques with special equipment that assist with physically controlling a vehicle.
13.  Explain the sensory-perceptual assessments of the stroke survivor before driving.
14.  Identify visual-perception and cognitive assessments for stroke survivors.
15.  Define basic operational and behavioral skills.
16.  Discuss the importance of the combination of clinical evaluation and an on-road evaluation.
17.  Demonstrate knowledge in the on-road driving evaluation for stroke survivors.
18.  Demonstrate knowledge in dysphagia management.
19.  Discuss the normal anatomy and physiology of the swallowing mechanism as it relates to dysphagia management.
20.  List and explain the five stages of swallowing.
21.  Identify the signs of dysphagia associate with stroke.
22.  Discuss medical complications associated with dysphagia in stroke.
23.  Identify the relationship of aspiration as it occurs in accordance with the site of lesions.
24.  Demonstrate knowledge in the alternative means of nutrition for patients with severe dysphagia.
25.  Discuss sexual function and intimacy following a stroke.
26.  Identify the effects of stroke on sexual function.
27.  Demonstrate knowledge in the various frameworks and models to address sexuality issues in health care.


Included in Module 6:  Enhancing Performance of ADLs, Parenting after Stroke, Mobility, Dysphagia Management and Sexual Functions
Chapter 21:  Enhancing Performance of ADLs
Chapter 22:  Parenting after Stroke
Chapter 23:  Driving and Community Mobility as an Instrumental ADL
Chapter 24:  Dysphagia Management
Chapter 25:  Sexual Function and Intimacy

Module 7: Seating and Wheeled Mobility, Home Evaluation, and ADL Adaptations
Stroke Rehabilitation
Module 7:  Seating and Wheeled Mobility, Home Evaluation, and ADL Adaptations
 
Module Goals and Objectives
 
Module Goals:This course is intended to instruct the professional through a self-paced study on Seating and Wheeled Mobility, Home Evaluation, and ADL Adaptations.
Professional Learning Objectives
1.    Discuss the seating and wheeled mobility prescription.
2.    Demonstrate knowledge in the seating system and mobility system evaluation.
3.    Explain asymmetrical pelvic positions, concerns, and common causes.
4.    Identify the complications associated with posterior pelvic tilt.
5.    Differentiate between the results of anterior pelvic tilt and pelvic rotation.
6.    Identify the initial focus of a mat evaluation.
7.    Discuss the general seating systems principles for individuals with stroke.
8.    Demonstrate knowledge in the typical patterns of adult hemiplegia.
9.    List the complications associated with asymmetrical postures.
10.Identify the goals of the seating system for stroke survivors.
11.Differentiate between linear, contoured and custom seating options.
12.Differentiate between rigid and folding manual wheelchairs.
13.Discuss the different options available for wheelchair hand rims.
14.Demonstrate knowledge in home evaluation and modification for stroke patients.
15.Discuss appropriate modifications to the exterior of the home for wheelchair accessibility.
16.Explain general considerations for wheelchair ramps.
17.Identify the optimal toilet seat height for transfers from a wheelchair.
18.Discuss modifications specific to the kitchen for wheelchair accessibility.
19.Discuss activities of daily living adaptations and managing the environment with one-handed techniques.
20.Identify factors to consider during bathing.
21.Discuss adaptive devices and when to introduce these to devices.
22.Demonstrate knowledge in the importance of leisure participation after stroke.
23.List factors that affect leisure attitude.
24.Define leisure role.
25.Discuss factors that affect leisure performance.
26.Discuss the various assessment tools available for evaluation of leisure skills.
Demonstrate knowledge in leisure interventions for stroke su

Included in Module 7:  Seating and Wheeled Mobility, Home Eval, and ADL Adaptations
Chapter 26:  Seating and Wheeled Mobility Prescription
Chapter 27:  Home Evaluation and Modifications
Chapter 28:  ADL Adaptations
Chapter 29:  Leisure Participation after Stroke
Chapter 30:  A Survivors Perspective
Chapter 31:  A Survivor’s Perspective II: Stroke