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This online ce course is offered in cooperation with Elsevier Science Publishing and utilizes text from the textbook “Athletic and Sport Issues in Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation” By David J. Magee, PhD, BPT, Robert C. Manske, DPT, MEd, MPT, SCS, ATC, CSCS, James E. Zachazewski, PT, DPT, SCS, ATC and William S. Quillen, PT, PhD, SCS, FACSM© 2011
 
Instructional Level: Beginner to Intermediate
 
Athletic and Sport Issues in Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation provides expert insight and clear rehabilitation guidelines to help you manage injuries and special medical needs unique to athletic clients.

Contributions from leading physical therapists, athletic trainers, and orthopedic surgeons give you a comprehensive, clinically relevant understanding of common sports-related injuries and help you ensure the most effective therapeutic outcomes.

Available for ChiropractorPhysical TherapistPhysical Therapist Assistant
 
Key Features

  • Addresses a broad range of sports-related injuries and conditions
  • Reinforces key concepts with highlighted content and hundreds of detailed illustrations
  • Summarizes essential information for fast, easy reference clinical settings

Table of Contents
 
SECTION I: PREPARATION AND PREVENTION IN SPORTS MEDICINE
 
1. Role of Sports Medicine Team
2. Preparticipation Evaluation and Physical Fitness Profiling
Part A: Preparticipation Evaluation
Part B: Physical Fitness Profiling
3. Psychosocial Aspects of Youth Sports
4. Nutrition Counseling and Athletes
5. Environmental Considerations for Sports
6. Use of Ergogenic Aids in Sport
7. Sports Drug Testing
 
SECTION II: APPLIED BIOMECHANICS OF SELECTED SPORT ACTIVITIES
 
8. Applied Biomechanics of Cycling
9. Applied Biomechanics of Golf
10. Applied Biomechanics of Jumping
11. Applied Biomechanics of Tennis
12. Applied Biomechanics of Soccer
13. Applied Biomechanics of Running
14. Applied Biomechanics of Swimming
15. Applied Biomechanics of Baseball Pitching
16. Applied Biomechanics of Common Weight Training Exercises
 
SECTION III: MANAGEMENT OF SPORTS INJURY AND ILLNESS
 
17. Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness
18. Medical Conditions in Sport
19. Dermatologic Considerations in Athletics
20. Protective Equipment in Sports
21. Taping for Athletics and Rehabilitation
22. Sports-Related Concussion
23. Traumatic Sports Injuries to the Cervical Spine
24. Maxillofacial Injuries
25. Abdominal and Thoracic Injuries
 
SECTION IV: SPECIAL POPULATIONS AND EPIDEMIOLOGY
 
26. The Female Athlete
27. Musculoskeletal Dance Medicine and Science
28. The Athlete with Disability
29. Selected Rehabilitation Needs of the Masters Athlete
30. Applied Sports Injury Epidemiology

Modules In Course

Module 1: Preparation and Prevention in Sports Medicine
Module Goals and Objectives
 
Module Goals:This course is intended to instruct the professional through a self-paced study of preparation and prevention techniques in sports medicine.
 
Professional Learning Objectives
1.Discuss all components of the sports medicine team.
2.Identify the many purposes and objectives of the preparticipation evaluations.
3.List the elements of preparticipation physical evaluations.
4.Explain the role the cardiovascular examination plays in determining if an athlete should participate in sport activities.
5.Demonstrate knowledge in various medical conditions and how they affect sports participation.
6.List the physical fitness tests that make up the physical fitness profile.
7.Differentiate between clinical, laboratory and field tests.
8.dentify the key tools for parents to enhance performance in children.
9.Discuss the psychological features of the injured athlete following injury.
10.Explain what it means when an athlete is experiencing burnout, staleness or a slump.
11.Identify the signs of depression using the mnemonic “SIGECAPS.”
12.Define second-impact syndrome and the susceptibility of young athletes.
13.Demonstrate knowledge in the female athlete triad.
14.Differentiate between the abnormal eating patterns of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.
15.Discuss the components of a nutritional assessment.
16.Identify the body’s preferred source of energy.
17.Demonstrate knowledge in the recommended carbohydrate intakes for various athletes.
18.Explain carbohydrate loading.
19.Differentiate between the essential and nonessential amino acids.
20.List the branched-chain amino acids and their contribution to the athlete.
21.Discuss sports anemia and its occurrence in athletes.
22.Identify factors that lead to increased risk of iron deficiency anemia.
23.Explain appropriate measures to monitor fluid loss during activity.
24.Discuss the fluid consumption guidelines.
25.Demonstrate knowledge in weight management as it pertains to athletes.


Included in Module 1: Preparation and Prevention in Sports Medicine

Chapter 1:  Role of the Sports Medicine Team
Chapter 2:  Preparation Evaluation and Physical Fitness Profiling
Chapter 3:  Psychological Aspects of Youth Sports
Chapter 4:  Nutrition Counseling Athletes
Module 2: Environmental Considerations, Drug Testing and Sports Injury Epidemiology
Module Goals and Objectives

Module Goals:This course is intended to instruct the professional through a self-paced study of environmental considerations, drug testing and sports injury epidemiology.
 
Professional Learning Objectives
  1. Demonstrate knowledge in body temperature regulation and energy balance.
  2. Identify core temperature responses to exercise-heat stress.
  3. Discuss heat acclimation.
  4. Identify the dangerous threats associated with dehydration.
  5. List the signs and symptoms of heat stroke.
  6. Identify the predisposing factors to hyponatremia.
  7. Explain the physiological responses to cold exposure.
  8. Demonstrate knowledge in the signs and symptoms associated with the 3 stages of hypothermia.
  9. Differentiate between the degrees of severity of frostbite.
  10. Explain circulatory responses at high altitudes.
  11. Demonstrate knowledge in high altitude illnesses.
  12. Discuss the physiology and physiological consequences of energy generation for endurance activity.
  13. Identify the adverse effect associated with hydration practices during prolonged exercise.
  14. Discuss branched-chain amino acids and their effect on endurance performance.
  15. Identify the roll that caffeine plays as an ergogenic aid among endurance athletes.
  16. Demonstrate knowledge in the use of ergogenic aids for speed and power.
  17. Identify the adverse effects of ergogenic aids.
  18. Explain the role of carbohydrates and protein supplements as ergogenic aids to increase muscle mass.
  19. List ergogenic aids for body composition that have little scientific support, lack investigation or are illegal.
  20. Discuss the three classifications of drugs in sports pharmacology.
  21. Explain the drug testing protocol and issues associated with it.
  22. Demonstrate knowledge in sports injury epidemiology.
  23. Differentiate between descriptive study design and analytical study design.
  24. Explain the appropriate use of cross-sectional study design.
  25. Identify the key feature and strength of the prospective cohort study as compared with other observational epidemiological designs.
  26. Discuss the disadvantages of each type of study design in sports epidemiology.
  27. Define multivariate regression.
  28. Differentiate between descriptive epidemiology and analytical epidemiology.
  29. Identify the most commonly reported types of injury at the high school and collegiate levels.


Included in Module 2:  Environmental Considerations, Drug Testing and Sports Injury Epidemiology

Chapter 5:  Environmental Considerations
Chapter 6:  Use of Ergogenic Aids in Sports
Chapter 7:  Sports Drug Testing
Chapter 30:  Applied Sports Injury Epidemiology
Module 3: Applied Biomechanics of Cycling, Golf, Jumping, Tennis and Soccer
Module Goals and Objectives
 
Module Goals:This course is intended to instruct the professional through a self-paced study of the applied biomechanics of cycling, golf, jumping, tennis and soccer.
 
Professional Learning Objectives
  1. Identify the importance and benefit of rhythmic cadence in cycling for patients with neurodegenerative disease.
  2. Discuss the kinematics of cycling.
  3. Explain in what ways lower limb range of motion on a bicycle can be affected.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge in the joint reaction forces of cycling.
  5. Differentiate between the actions of the hip and knee during the propulsive phase of cycling.
  6. Discuss the influence that bike configuration has on the cyclist.
  7. Demonstrate knowledge in muscle activity patterns in the lower extremities of a cyclist.
  8. Identify the benefit of cycling implemented in rehabilitation following injuries involving the two – joint muscles of the lower extremities.
  9. Explain overuse injuries and how they occur in cycling.
  10. List the phases of the golf swing.
  11. Discuss the impact phase of the golf swing and the greater risk for injury associated with this phase.
  12. Demonstrate knowledge in the lower limb biomechanics of golf and the injury relationship associated with these biomechanics.
  13. Identify equipment considerations that must be considered by the health care professional when treating golfers.
  14. Differentiate between the various types of jumps.
  15. Explain the biomechanics of the vertical jump.
  16. Define reach height and loss height.
  17. Discuss the common movement patters observed in vertical jumps.
  18. Demonstrate knowledge in using the vertical jump as a training tool to build lower body power and as strength and conditioning exercises.
  19. Discuss the broad jump kinematics and kinetics.
  20. Identify the male and female landing differences.
  21. Explain the inherent demands of tennis on the shoulder.
  22. Differentiate between the push – through and pull – through kinetic chains during the service motion of tennis.
  23. Discuss the open – stances and the benefit is provides to the athlete.
  24. Demonstrate knowledge in factors that limit range of motion of the shoulder.
  25. Discuss the biomechanics of the kicking motion in soccer.
  26. Identify implications of the biomechanics used when heading the ball.
  27. Discuss soccer related injuries and the implications of rehabilitation.


Included in Module 3:  Applied Biomechanics of Cycling, Golf, Jumping, Tennis and Soccer

Chapter 8:  Applied Biomechanics of Cycling
Chapter 9:  Applied Biomechanics of Golf
Chapter 10:  Applied Biomechanics of Jumping
Chapter 11:  Applied Biomechanics of Tennis
Chapter 12:  Applied Biomechanics of Soccer
Module 4: Applied Biomechanics of Running, Swimming, Baseball Pitching and Common Weight Training Exercises.
Module Goals and Objectives
 
Module Goals:This course is intended to instruct the professional through a self-paced study of the applied biomechanics of running, swimming, baseball pitching and common weight training exercises.
 
Professional Learning Objectives
  1. Demonstrate knowledge in the specific biomechanics of running.
  2. Differentiate between the support phase and the recovery phase of a stride.
  3. List the three components of the support phase of the stride.
  4. Discuss typical range-of-motion values for the lower extremities during running.
  5. Identify implications associated with pelvic drop during running.
  6. Explain the influence of ground reaction forces.
  7. Discuss the various footwear considerations in the management of running injuries.
  8. Differentiate between rigid orthosis and semiflexible orthosis identifying the advantages and disadvantages of both.
  9. Discuss the biomechanics associated with specific strokes in swimming.
  10. Explain the role the shoulder plays in the freestyle, backstroke, and butterfly stroke.
  11. List the mechanics of the freestyle stroke.
  12. Identify the mechanics involved during the butterfly stroke.
  13. Differentiate the mechanics used in the backstroke and breaststroke.
  14. Demonstrate knowledge in flexibility screens used for swimmers.
  15. Discuss the applied biomechanics of baseball pitching.
  16. Define the phases of throwing.
  17. Demonstrate knowledge in the phases of throwing.
  18. Identify when maximum elbow angular velocity occurs during pitching.
  19. Explain shoulder joint forces and torques during the follow-through and deceleration phase.
  20. Identify the kinematic and kinetic comparisons among the fastball, curveball, slider, and change-up pitches.
  21. Discuss common shoulder injuries in pitching.
  22. List the compartments of the elbow and the risk factor associated with each.
  23. Demonstrate knowledge in the biomechanics of weightlifting exercises and the spine.
  24. Identify the muscle activity patterns during weightlifting.
  25. Differentiate between the local stabilizer muscles and the global stabilizer muscles.
  26. Discuss the squatting exercise and its important role in hip, knee, and back muscle training.
  27. Explain trunk flexion and trunk extension exercises.
  28. Identify preferable weightlifting exercises to be implemented during PCL and ACL rehabilitation.


Included in Module 4:  Applied Biomechanics of Running, Swimming, Baseball Pitching and Common Weight Training Exercises

Chapter 13:  Applied Biomechanics of Running
Chapter 14:  Applied Biomechanics of Swimming
Chapter 15:  Applied Biomechanics of Baseball Pitching
Chapter 16:  Applied Biomechanics of Common Weight Training Exercises
Module 5: Medical Conditions, Dermatologic Considerations, Protective Equipment and Evidence Based Research of Taping in Sports Medicine
Module Goals and Objectives
 
Module Goals:This course is intended to instruct the professional through a self-paced study of Medical Conditions, Dermatologic Considerations, Protective Equipment and Evidence Based Research of Taping in Sports Medicine.
 
Professional Learning Objectives
  1. Demonstrate knowledge in delayed-onset muscle soreness.
  2. Identify the muscle receptors responsible or pressure-mediated pain.
  3. Explain the time course of delayed onset muscle soreness.
  4. Discuss Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in young people and competitive athletes.
  5. Differentiate between hyperadrenergic hypertension and hyperdynamic hypertension.
  6. Discuss Marfan syndrome.
  7. Define exercise-induced bronchospasm.
  8. List pharmacological treatments available for altitude sickness.
  9. Demonstrate knowledge in common causes of anemia in athletes.
  10. Differentiate between the symptoms of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia as they may present in athletes.
  11. Differentiate between myositis ossificans traumatica and myositis ossificans progressiva.
  12. Discuss dermatological considerations in athletics.
  13. Discuss piezogenic papules and their occurrence in endurance athletes.
  14. Identify skin conditions caused by equipment.
  15. List skin conditions caused by heat and sweat.
  16. Discuss the susceptibility of athletes to the Verruca virus.
  17. Demonstrate knowledge in the possible exposure of athletes to parasites.
  18. Discuss photo (sun exposure) injuries.
  19. Differentiate between exostosis and chilblains.
  20. Discuss scar revision and the ideal time to begin scar revision procedures.
  21. Demonstrate knowledge in the use of protective equipment in sports.
  22. Identify factors that should be considered when testing protective equipment.
  23. Discuss the techniques that must be involved to appropriately ensure the proper fitting of a helmet.
  24. Demonstrate knowledge of the three classifications of protective eye equipment.
  25. Identify the disadvantages of knee bracing during competition.
  26. Discuss both evidence for and evidence against taping for sports medicine and rehabilitation.


Included in Module 5:  Medical Conditions, Dermatologic Considerations, Protective Equipment and Evidence Based Research of Taping in Sports Medicine

Chapter 17:  Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness
Chapter 18:  Medical Conditions in Sport
Chapter 19:  Dermatologic Considerations in Athletes
Chapter 20:  Protective Equipment in Sports
Chapter 21:  Taping for Athletes and Rehabilitation
Module 6: Concussions, Traumatic Injuries to the Cervical Spine, Maxillofacial Injuries, Abdominal and Thoracic Injuries.
Module Goals and Objectives
 
Module Goals:This course is intended to instruct the professional through a self-paced study of Concussions, Traumatic Injuries to the Cervical Spine, Maxillofacial Injuries, Abdominal and Thoracic Injuries.
 
Professional Learning Objectives
  1. Discuss sports-related concussions.
  2. List possible symptoms associated with a concussion reported athletes.
  3. Differentiate between retrograde and anterograde amnesia.
  4. Identify the most common reported symptom of a concussion.
  5. Demonstrate knowledge in second impact syndrome (SIS).
  6. Discuss the current return-to-play criteria following a concussion.
  7. Discuss the relevance of gender and the symptoms reported following a concussion.
  8. Discuss traumatic sports injuries to the cervical spine.
  9. Demonstrate knowledge of the common complaints associated with brachial plexus injuries.
  10. Discuss the frequency of injury to the cervical spine.
  11. Explain sport-specific incidence of cervical spine trauma.
  12. Discuss the guidelines for appropriate care of the spine-injured athlete specifically as it pertains to face-mask removal.
  13. Identify the training device that is predominantly associated with cervical spine injuries in gymnastics.
  14. Define spinal shock.
  15. Discuss the radiological examination of the spine-injured athlete.
  16. Demonstrate knowledge in maxillofacial injuries.
  17. Identify the signs and symptoms of a laryngeal injury.
  18. Explain the fundamental importance of knowledge of the anatomy of the eye and evaluation of injuries.
  19. Differentiate between anterior and posterior eye segment injuries.
  20. Discuss facial fractures.
  21. Identify the most likely mid-facial bone to be fractured in the context of injuries related to athletics.
  22. Demonstrate knowledge in abdominal and thoracic injuries.
  23. Identify the various types of hernia, as well as, understand the frequency of each.
  24. Explain the treatment of choice for athletic pubalgia.
  25. Discuss the complete examination of the abdomen.
  26. Discuss intra-abdominal structures that could be injured in sports.
  27. Define hematocele.
  28. Demonstrate knowledge of common fractures of the ribs.
  29. List the symptoms of a mild contusion.
 


Included in Module 6:  Concussions, Traumatic Injuries to the Cervical Spine, Maxillofacial Injuries, Abdominal and Thoracic Injuries

Chapter 22:  Sports Related Concussion
Chapter 23:  Traumatic Injuries to the Cervical Spine
Chapter 24:  Maxillofacial Injuries
Chapter 25:  Abdominal and Thoracic Injuries
Module 7: Female Athletes, Musculoskeletal Dance Medicine, Athletes with Disabilities and the Selected Needs of the Masters Athlete
Module Goals and Objectives
 
Module Goals:This course is intended to instruct the professional through a self-paced study Female Athletes, Musculoskeletal Dance Medicine, Athlete’s with Disabilities and the Selected Needs of the Masters Athlete.
Professional Learning Objectives
  1. Discuss the physiological and musculoskeletal differences between the sexes.
  2. Identify both intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors of the female athlete.
  3. Identify the relationship between menstrual cycle and anterior cruciate ligament injuries.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge in medial tibial stress syndrome.
  5. Discuss the female athlete triad.
  6. List the absolute and relative contraindications to exercise during pregnancy.
  7. Differentiate between dancers as compared with traditional athletes.
  8. Demonstrate knowledge of the "Dancer’s Psyche," as it applies to determining when an injury may exist.
  9. Explain the incidence of injury associated with the lower extremity of dancers.
  10. Discuss the ankle and foot in demi-plié, demi-pointe and en pointe positions as it applies to classical dance.
  11. Identify the ideal ballet turnout and complications associated with a forced turnout.
  12. Define dancer’s tendinopathy.
  13. Explain the common overuse injury of dance associated with the second metatarsal shaft.
  14. Discuss anterior cruciate ligament injuries and the occurrence of ACL injuries in dance.
  15. Demonstrate knowledge in treating athletes with disabilities.
  16. List areas of considerations when performing movement analysis for disabled athletes.
  17. Explain the psychosocial considerations of disabled athletes.
  18. Identify common injuries of athletes who compete in wheelchairs.
  19. Discuss injuries that can occur in athletes with amputees.
  20. Demonstrate types of bursitis that can be reported in amputee athletes.
  21. Discuss the rehabilitative management of the disabled athletes.
  22. Identify disability-specific medical problems.
  23. Define autonomic dysreflexia.
  24. Demonstrate knowledge in the most likely occurrence of seizures in athletes with cerebral palsy.
  25. Demonstrate knowledge in selected rehabilitation needs of the masters athlete.
  26. Discuss the decrease in flexibility with age.
  27. Discuss osteoarthritis and the masters athlete.
  28. Identify the most common predisposing factor for hip osteoarthritis.
  29. List the tendons that are particularly vulnerable to degenerative pathological conditions.
  30. Discuss joint arthroplasty.
  31. Explain sports activity in the masters athlete following total joint arthroplasty.
  32. Identify recommended activities as compared to those activities not recommended following total shoulder arthroplasty.


Included in Module 7:  Female Athletes, Musculoskeletal Dance Medicine, Athlete’s with Disabilities and the Selected Needs of the Masters Athlete

Chapter 26:  The Female Athlete
Chapter 27:  Musculosketal Dance Medicine and Science
Chapter 28:  The Athlete with Disability
Chapter 29:  Selected Rehabilitation Needs of the Masters Athlete